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Kaleidoscope of Monarch Butterflies

More than a rabble or a swarm, a kaleidoscope of Monarch Butterflies rests at the farm of Bert Lewis, in Northport. Monarchs are especially noted for their lengthy annual southward migration starting in August and going until the first frost. The southern Prince Edward Point National Wildlife Area (southern tip of The County) provides a critical place of rest for migrating wildlife. Songbirds, raptors and other species gather by the thousands during migration to rest and feed before they continue on their journey. There is a broad diversity (variety) of habitat on the point, both on land and water, and food is abundant. More than 300 species of birds have been recorded on the point, including songbirds, waterfowl, owls and hawks. In autumn, thousands of migrating hawks and owls take advantage of the open fields to hunt for rodents. Monarch Butterflies and various bats also pass through during migration. Leigh-Anne Stringer photo

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  1. Karen Smith says:

    The Monarchs had the travesty a few years back of freezing while wintering in Mexico and millions died.
    Let’s hope they don’t have another travesty here in The County in the arms of giant windmills.
    Let the windmills go elsewhere.
    If 600 birds and bats were eliminated in the first 6 months at other windmill sites, why are we opting for them here?
    How many small critters like the Monarch have also parished already by the swipes of windmills.
    Let’s remember that we can use solar instead.
    Tell Mr. McGuinty how you feel about this issue.
    May we always have the beauty of Monarch Butterflies right here in PEC.

  2. Karen Smith says:

    The Monarchs had the travesty a few years back of freezing while wintering in Mexico and millions died.
    Let’s hope they don’t have anothertravesty here in The County in the arms of giant windmills.
    Let the windmills go elsewhere.
    If 600 birds and bats were eliminated in the first 6 months at other windmill sites, why are we opting for them here?
    How many small critters like the Monarch have also parished already by the swipes of windmills.
    Let’s remember that we can use solar instead.
    Tell Mr. McGuinty how you feel about this issue.
    May we always have the beauty of Monarch Butterflies right here in PEC.

  3. Jeanette says:

    WOW – this brings back memories!!! About 15 years ago, when I lived in Cressy, this happened to us. There were 2 huge trees that looked orange because there were so many monarch butterflies covering them. It was breathtaking.

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