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Flood worry low in PEC; warnings remain for areas north

flood watch

APRIL 11 – Heavy rain in the forecast, plus snow melt for the northern parts of the Quinte watersheds mean flood warnings stay in place, but the County has been downgraded to a ‘water safety statement’.

“Prince Edward County has been downgraded to a Water Safety Statement,” said Quinte Conservation’s water resources manager Bryon Keene. “This level indicates that high flows, unsafe banks, melting ice or other factors could be dangerous for users such as anglers, boaters, swimmers, children or pets.  Flooding is not expected.”

Concerns remain north of the County.

“Everything leveled off yesterday, however the warm weather in the north has caused increased melting and all waterways have increased in flow,”  “We are getting calls from every area in our watershed, all lakes are full and will continue to rise and create problems over the weekend. The big concern at this time is the potential for up to 50 mm of rain in the northern part of our watershed, if that happens we could surpass 2008 (flood) levels.  We have all staff involved and will continue all weekend.”

Keene says snow melt entering the river systems adds about 2 cm of water every day, but “what is going to melt over the next three days is enough to keep the rivers high.  Any rain that is added will make things worse.”

The southern portions of the Salmon and Napanee Rivers have crested but could crest again depending on the rain received.  Quinte Conservation staff may need to operate dams on the Depot Lakes systems, causing water levels in Depot Creek to rise.

Milder temperatures, snow melt and rain could cause some localized or nuisance flooding of smaller creeks and in ditches in the Moira River watershed.  Homeowners in low-lying areas downstream of Stoco Lake, in Foxboro, Plainfield and Carleton Cove will see increasing flooding around their homes through to the weekend.  Stoco Lake has been rising on average about 30 cm a day and Moira Lake has been rising on average about 15 cm a day.

A ‘Flood Warning’ means flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities and individuals are told to take action to deal with flood conditions. This may include road closures and evacuations.

Residents who are concerned that their homes may require sandbagging should contact their municipality.

Quinte Conservation staff are monitoring conditions closely.  Anyone concerned about flooding or ice jams may call the Quinte Conservation office at (613) 968-3434 or (613) 354-3312.

Flood watch for PEC; Belleville declares emergency

APRIL 11 – Belleville Mayor Neil Ellis made a declaration of emergency Thursday afternoon due to flood conditions north of the city as rain is causing local rivers and creeks to flow faster and higher.

The Moira River watershed is one area of Flood Warnings and sandbagging work was under way in Foxboro and Corbyville.

Quinte Conservation reports waterways in Prince Edward County have crested and will crest again following the rain. The County is in a Flood Watch as a potential for flooding exists. Most of the watershed has received 25 millimeters of rain.  More rain is forecast for Thursday.Homeowners in flood-prone areas are advised to ensure their valuables are high and dry and sump pumps are in working order.

Water levels in the Napanee and Salmon Rivers have risen quickly and Quinte Conservation issued a Flood Warning for these areas Wednesday.

“Larger river systems have been rising slowly from the snow melt. Heavy rain along with a warming trend, could cause them to overspill their banks toward the end of the week. Water levels could reach average or above average for spring melt conditions,” said Bryon Keene, water resources manager with Quinte Conservation. “Ice conditions in the area are extremely unsafe. We are advising local municipalities and watershed residents to be aware of changing conditions.”

Milder temperatures, snow melt and rain could cause some localized or nuisance flooding of smaller creeks and in ditches in Quinte Conservation’s watersheds.

Quinte Conservation reports that most of the snow in the southern portion of the watershed has melted. The last snow report, completed on March 31, shows there is still about 150 millimeters of snow in the north. The snow melt will continue to feed rivers well into next week and flows in local waterways will steadily increase through to mid-April.

flood1bAPRIL 1 – Moderate temperatures and a forecast with little rain for this week have reduced the risk of flooding and ice jams on area waterways.

“With the weather we are having now conditions are perfect for a slow and easy melt over the next few days. Ice is melting in place and we have had no reports of ice jams,” said Bryon Keene, Quinte Conservation Water Resources manager.

Quinte Conservation issued a Flood Outlook Statement last Thursday as the temperatures were rising and there was concern that ice jams would form.

“If the current weather pattern continues and we don’t receive any rain our rivers are in good shape to easily handle the melt.”

Keene predicts the melt will last some time and flows in local waterways will steadily increase through April.

MARCH 27 Moderate temperatures and a forecast with little rain for this week have reduced the risk of flooding and ice jams on area waterways.

“With the weather we are having now conditions are perfect for a slow and easy melt over the next few days. Ice is melting in place and we have had no reports of ice jams,” said Bryon Keene, Quinte Conservation Water Resources manager.

Quinte Conservation issued a Flood Outlook Statement last Thursday as the temperatures were rising and there was concern that ice jams would form.

“If the current weather pattern continues and we don’t receive any rain our rivers are in good shape to easily handle the melt.”

Keene predicts the melt will last some time and flows in local waterways will steadily increase through April.

MARCH 26 – The unusually cold temperatures are expected to break Friday with a high of 8, but with that – near normal temperatures through the end of next week – comes the potential of flooding.

“Warmer temperatures, along with forecast rain, could cause ice jams in the southern parts of the Quinte watersheds” particularly Prince Edward County, says Bryon Keene, Water Resources Manager.

Keene recommends waterfront property owners make sure that any valuables in their yard are placed in a high and dry location.

“We predict that river flows may increase and the thicker than normal ice cover could be broken up and cause ice jams where rivers narrow,” he said. “Smaller creeks in the southern Quinte area particularly in Prince Edward County, Deseronto, Napanee, and Belleville will respond more quickly to the warm temperatures and rain and will be at a higher risk to ice jams.”

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