All County, All the Time Since 2010 MAKE THIS YOUR PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY HOME...PAGE!  Tuesday, November 24th, 2020

To Dream the Impossible Dream

Steve Campbell

Steve Campbell

My apologies for the long absence, but 2014 has proved to be a most tumultuous and traumatizing year so far. I won’t go into details, but somebody screwed up the Mayan calendar, in which 2012 was supposed to be the Year of Change.
I have a grievance filed with the Mayan Municipal Board, and expect to appear at their hearing in Peru, if I can locate a translator.

So I’m back. And, in the 11th hour before the provincial election, I still don’t have any advice for you. Yes, I’m still as confused as you are.
I think it shows a clear lack of leadership in all the provincial parties that we are forced to choose between the devil and a possible other devil. I’m always amused when the ‘attack ads’ start, because it’s a rare opportunity to see several devils fighting at the same time.
My position against the fascist/soviet pretend ‘democracy’ of the provincial Liberals has been stated many times. It’s sad to me, because I have voted Liberal more often than not, back when it didn’t blow money like a drunken sailor, buy out its own mistakes, pass the bucks directly to their cronies, and run a Visa bill on our backs that could easily feed everyone in a third-world country, such as Nova Scotia.
Hudak, oddly enough, considering he has lots to attack, is playing it pretty cool, but I laugh out loud at the Liberal ads which conjure the ghost of Mike Harris, who is still under your bed when you go to sleep at night, bumping elbows with the Boogie Man.
Sure, I hated Mike Harris too, but come on! Way different players; way different game.
And sure, Hudak isn’t the most exciting person in the world. I doubt that teenage girls have posters of Tim pinned to the ceiling over their beds, but perhaps he might turn out to be a benevolent dictator, instead of one who treats Rural Ontario like their personal toilet.

We can only Dream the Impossible Dream.
When push comes to shove, I inevitably cast my vote for the local person I can reach by phone, who will listen to my concerns, and help.
Now, on to another topic, which started out to be a letter to the editor, but which grew into a column in my head.

Specifically, I would like to comment on Richard Parks’ letter in the last issue of the Times. He already knows we tend to disagree on, well, everything, so this will not come as a surprise.
He scoffs at seasonal jobs as not serving the purpose of County growth.
I beg to differ.
First of all, those lowly, low-paid jobs of part-time, seasonal workers, and those servers and waitresses, are absolutely essential to the County. If you doubt this, go into a restaurant and shout your order into the kitchen, if there is someone around to give you a menu, and then figure out when you can go into the kitchen to pick it up.

These are not lowly jobs. They are jobs all of us have had, and I can guarantee you they are great learning experiences. I still refer back to lessons I learned working my way through college in the Towers Camera Department in Belleville. ‘Part-time’ paid my tuition before I graduated, and I learned an awful lot about how to deal with people in a retail situation. And, believe me, some of them were jerks, but learning how to deal with jerks is also a part of life, and a foundation for future careers.

Not only should these jobs not be dismissed as unworthy, they are virtually the only thing the County has to offer right now.
Take a look at two businesses, established in the County, who wished to expand and hire more people: Fields on West Lake and Hillier Estates Winery.
Did anyone pound the drum on: “Yes, more jobs, more money, larger businesses, count me in!”
No. Both of them suffered at the hands of their neighbours, who put their interests ahead of economic growth.
The main flaw in Richard’s letter is in his own words: “That may explain why council looks for full-time jobs …”

Do they? Sure, they look for them. But who’s looking? The Economic Development officer is gone. A Community Development officer has been put in his place, and pretty much everything in the way of ‘development’ has been thrown in his lap. With the demise of Taste the County, I suspect he just inherited another six jobs to add to his list of ‘Things to Do’.
So tell me, who is out there bringing in big business with 12-month employment and good wages. When I look around, I see Nobody. And Nobody will have a difficult job bringing in Big Businesses who aren’t interested in us.
Why? Because we can’t support them.

If you want to build a big plant with 100 or more employees, close to the 401, you get to choose Sophiasburgh. Try running a business that size on a septic tank and a well.
Ameliasburgh is another option, just across a really narrow bridge. But, to service them, why not just go to Quinte West, which is ready to roll on Big Business with all the services and immediate 401 access?
So you can “look for full-time jobs” all you want but you, too, are Dreaming the Impossible Dream. You’re just staring off into the distance, hoping that some large employer will walk in some day and cut a really large cheque. I’d like that too, but I live in the real world.

Before Dan Taylor started his job as EDO, he appeared in my shop, since my name came up several times as “someone you should talk to”.
I told him what I will tell you: “The heart and soul of all Rural Ontario is in small business. Entrepreneurs who can start small and build, expanding and adding employees.” And yes, there’s a surprising number of small businesses that are open year-round and employ people at decent wages. I like to think I’m one of them.
I also told Dan: “You will inevitably turn to tourism and attracting small business, and Council will hate you for it, because they want another Essroc. You won’t be able to get it and, when you don’t, they will discard you.”
He surprised me by taking on the growth of the wine industry (many of whom are also year-round employers), and nobody seems to remember how that happened.
But it wasn’t by accident, it was through planning and a direction for future growth.
Who holds that job now? Nobody. Give him a call.

Filed Under: News from Everywhere ElseSteve Campbell

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  1. Marnie says:

    Real country folks have better sense than to move to the big cities but let’s suppose that some of them they did. If they were to complain they would be considered mildly amusing. No one would bother to listen to them. I’m sure someone would remind them that when in Rome – – .

  2. Wolf Braun says:

    Well Gary it’s good see that you’re able to ‘attack the messenger’ while avoiding any meaningful and factual discussion.

    Am equal case could be made that when a “country person” does move to the big city that they just might complain about all the evils of big city noises, smells and city folks, therefore demand that all be lowered to their country comfort levels.

  3. Gary says:

    Wolf do you live in a rural setting? I hope so because you sure are spreading a lot of it! Pheww!!

  4. Marnie says:

    I don’t have a favourite real estate agent Wolf. If city people move to a rural property fully aware that they are going to experience the sounds and smells of working farms and accept that, fine. They will be good neighbours. The complainers who want the sanitized country life and complain every time a farmer spreads manure or a rooster crows should stay in an urban area or buy an isolated rural property. You are being nonsensical if you think they have the right to rewrite county history and put diapers on cows.

  5. Richard Parks says:

    @ Steve Campbell: You should have just picked up the phone and we could have had a chat. 30 plus and counting.
    This has gone so far from Economic Development and low paying jobs that it’s not even funny. Anyway, it is good to hear everyone’s thoughts and opinions.

  6. Wolf Braun says:

    Marnie: ” Wolf, I am sure you would not shop for a new suit at Canadian Tire or look for mechanic’s tools at Giant Tiger yet when former city residents move to the county and buy country properties in a farming community, solely for residential purposes, they do just that. If they have no intention of farming, dislike the smell of manure and do not want the aggravation of geese they are obviously shopping in the wrong place”

    No they don’t !!! You’re talking nonsense Marnie.

    First of all you are lumping everyone in the same pool. People moving to WOTL are not impacted by farming. Nor are people buying in Picton, Bloomfield, Wellington and other smaller hamlets.

    Secondly, some people buy small (10-20 acre) residential homes located amongst farms because they might want to keep a couple of horses, chickens, etc.. These people are not bothered by farm odours. My brother-in-law and his wife are a good example. But there are many others. Just ask your favorite real estate agent why people buy here. A lot of it has to do with retirement. City congestion and many other factors.

    Thirdly, there are people who only want 3 seasonal cottages. Again, they want waterfront even if it means there’s a farm next door. Their only concern in that kind of neighbor is water quality and a certain amount of privacy. I know lots of farmers who get along well with cottagers. Some of them earn a little extra keeping lane ways open in the winter.

  7. Marnie says:

    Wolf, I am sure you would not shop for a new suit at Canadian Tire or look for mechanic’s tools at Giant Tiger yet when former city residents move to the county and buy country properties in a farming community, solely for residential purposes, they do just that. If they have no intention of farming, dislike the smell of manure and do not want the aggravation of geese they are obviously shopping in the wrong place.

  8. Wolf Braun says:

    I detest politics wilson ! But, anyone who is brave enough to run for any level of government needs to clearly understand what their purpose is as well they need to follow a clear, concise and easy to understand principles when making decisions on our behalf. To do that, we need to help them. How they speak, act, includes us and we need to define their purpose. And to do that, they’ll need all of us. Wanna work on that together ? 🙂

  9. Wolf Braun says:

    Art: ” Weddings occur at Fields of Westlake and Hillier Creek Estates every weekend from May until November. Don’t quite see how hosting a wedding or conference is agriculture related event.”

    Your number is a bit exaggerated, but I get your point. I’ve never said that weddings or conferences is agriculture related. I maintain the onus is on the planning dept. to be consistent with its policy when issuing permits to potential developers of wineries.

  10. judy kennedy says:

    Art is absolutely correct. Change is good. Thoughtless change is not. Agriculture is still the prime industry in the county. Look it up.
    We all need to work together, but uninformed ideas about rural life and Disneyfication are not appropriate here.

  11. Wolf Braun says:

    >>>Now that’s an interesting concept Wolf. To carry it a little further, if I were to subscribe to it I would have to believe that since five generations of my family have lived in the county I was here long before you came along as a sometime-resident. Does that mean that, if we lived next door, you should not be allowed to own geese or canaries because I might not like it? After all I was here first.

    Allowed perhaps. More importantly, there should be communication between you and I about what each of us wants, desires, needs etc.. That’s just what normal people should be doing. I realize that as Canadians we’re becoming more like our U.S. neighbors and heading to the courts more regularly now.

    >>>>If someone who lives in the city moves to the country that individual should realize that agricultural practices that go back for generations are not likely to grind to a halt simply for the sake of his or her “tranquility”.

    That would make good sense Marnie.

    >>>I believe you once sold real estate. Would you actually sell a small farm to someone, then caution them not to plan on putting any livestock in the barn because while it might look like a farm, smell like a farm and have outbuildings for livestock, it cannot be a farm because the Hamilton stockbroker who has retired next door wouldn’t like it.

    I still have a real estate license. Will for another two years or longer. I’m still in the business. I consider the purpose of my job is to make sure that all parties in a real estate transaction stay out of trouble. So in your scenario, I would definitely attempt to ascertain what the buyer’s intentions were and to counsel them about potential conflicts with neighbors.

  12. wilson says:

    Welcome to the County John Walker! You are exactly what the County needs! Wolf Braun please run for council!!

  13. Marnie says:

    Well said, Art.

  14. Art says:

    “How would you feel living next door to a farm when the farmer is out plowing, cultivating or cutting hay until 2 in the morning and his equipment is keeping you awake?”

    Just fine …… I live between two cash crop farmers, the difference is plowing occurs once per year, cultivating occurs once per year and cutting of hay occurs two times per year.
    Big difference Wolf. These uses are considered prime “agricultural uses”
    Weddings occur at Fields of Westlake and Hillier Creek Estates every weekend from May until November. Don’t quite see how hosting a wedding or conference is agriculture related event.
    Bottom line is Wolf if I buy a house next to the Picton fairgrounds then I expect the fair, the circus, car shows, weddings and conference related events to be at this type of venue. The facility is zoned accordingly. However if I buy a piece of property next to a farm I might expect some farming practises that include some 2 am activities because sometimes you have to get crops in the ground due to weather challenges. I also might expect smells if the farm happens to have livestock.
    Weddings and conferences….. are not agricultural in nature they are a commercial event and property should be required to meet the appropriate zoning requirements of commercial zoning.

  15. Marnie says:

    Now that’s an interesting concept Wolf. To carry it a little further, if I were to subscribe to it I would have to believe that since five generations of my family have lived in the county I was here long before you came along as a sometime-resident. Does that mean that, if we lived next door, you should not be allowed to own geese or canaries because I might not like it? After all I was here first.

    If someone who lives in the city moves to the country that individual should realize that agricultural practices that go back for generations are not likely to grind to a halt simply for the sake of his or her “tranquility”. I believe you once sold real estate. Would you actually sell a small farm to someone, then caution them not to plan on putting any livestock in the barn because while it might look like a farm, smell like a farm and have outbuildings for livestock, it cannot be a farm because the Hamilton stockbroker who has retired next door wouldn’t like it. Our friends bought that property in good faith and were not contravening any zoning bylaws. It was the neighbour who seemed to have the wrong idea of what the word country means.

    Nobody goes for a Sunday drive on the 401 and no smart person from the city buys a country property next to a small farm expecting that it will never be home to livestock.

  16. Wolf Braun says:

    >>> John Walker…. Have you considered running for council? You’ll have my vote.

    John is right. It is about balance. And that means including the wishes, wants and needs of all.

  17. Wolf Braun says:

    Marnie: “It really does not matter which one of them was there first Wolf”

    Sure it does. Your statement above leads me to believe that your friend was not first. Is that correct?

    It’s not about the geese Marnie. Geese can pretty much live anywhere. It’s about how neighbours respect each other so that both can enjoy the tranquility of The County.

  18. Loretta says:

    John Walker…. Have you considered running for council? You’ll have my vote.

  19. Marnie says:

    It really does not matter which one of them was there first Wolf. My friend bought a farm property in the country because he wanted a few farm animals. Geese are farm fowl. Would you have them live at the Westwind? The Torontonian bought a rural property too and should not have been surprised to find that new neighbours might want to own farm animals. What did he think went on in the countryside? Too many city people move here with unreal expectations. Long before we were wine, cheese, party barns we were a thriving agricultural community. Now we have gone all Martha Stewart. Old-fashioned country living is now being marketed in a sanitized version. Farm barns are now ‘party barns’ and the normal sights, sounds, and smells of rural Prince Edward County are being edited to suit the tender sensibilities of city folk. Things have come to a pretty pass when a goose can’t honk in the country.

  20. Wolf Braun says:

    Mark: “”I have lived here all my life as well not off and on, returning summers and taking a hiatus to Montreal until finally settling.”

    Taking a break to Montreal was a career job transfer – 1986 to 1995. During that time we continued to pay taxes to the County for the property here.

    Does “living here all my life” have special privileges Mark?

  21. Wolf Braun says:

    Marnie: ” had a good friend who moved to the county and bought a rural property because he had come from another rural area and wanted to keep a few animals. He and his wife worked hard to renovate their new home and a small barn on the property. Then they bought some geese”

    Who was there first? Your friend or the neighbour?

  22. Mark says:

    I have to support Marnie on much of this debate. I have lived here all my life as well not off and on, returning summers and taking a hiatus to Montreal until finally settling. Picton is not as nice and Bloomfield has been virtually character changed. I cannot imagine a local wanting to buy a home there or a longtime local that doesn’t want out! I think Marnie hit the nail on the head when she made reference to it being like owning a beach house and having constant company.Many do not like the change. I personally am not pleased with the stress on our infrastructure, policing, emergency services etc.that locals are now being drastically impacted by and having to pay for. I still am not convinced that the return is worth the cost.

  23. Marnie says:

    Just being silly? I don’t think so Wolf. I had a good friend who moved to the county and bought a rural property because he had come from another rural area and wanted to keep a few animals. He and his wife worked hard to renovate their new home and a small barn on the property. Then they bought some geese. Their next-door neighbour complained bitterly although he was living beside a farm property. He said the geese were noisy and he left Toronto for peace and quiet. My friend decided that the county was not such a friendly place after all, sold up and moved north of Belleville. Then there was the city slicker who complained about the noise of the tow planes that pulled the air cadets’ gliders. City people do come here and protest what are normal sights and sounds in a rural area.

    It was interesting to read that at one time the county had enough “canaries” to provide canned goods to a large area of Canada. It seems they flew the coop.

    It’s reassuring to know that you appreciate your farmer neighbours and take pie to them. Keep up the good work.

    As for my inability to appreciate that wedding barns help their owners to make a living – I thought many of these party barn owners were doctors, lawyers and other professionals. Also, I really do understand that weddings provide employment for caterers and florists. I’ve been married twice so please do not suggest that I am not supportive of these people. I’ve done my part.

  24. Wolf Braun says:

    >>>>Unlike you I was not here “off and on”.

    I bought my first house in the County in 1972. My career caused me to move in 1977. From then on we were here almost every summer except the 9 yrs we lived in Montreal. Even then we made it back to see the many changes in the County on a fairly consistent basis. More importantly, we kept in touch with the many friends that we made here. Came back here in 1995. Leaving here in a box. 🙂 I think during all those years I’ve noticed changes. Not all changes are good but ‘we’ elect our local politicians to plan change while keeping in mind our heritage here in the County. Every town / city that I’ve lived in in Canada and Europe has undergone significant changes. To me that seems normal given the changes in almost everything that has affected our planet.

    >>> Fine to say that those of us who want to run errands in Picton should be happy to park in some out of the way spot then trot back to Main Street.

    Are you suggesting I said that. I didn’t. Please don’t suggest that I did. My wife and I were in Toronto overnight this weekend visiting friends. As we ended up on the Gardiner Expressway ‘parking lot’ we both looked at each other and said “sure glad we don’t have to deal with this mess every day”. We are truly blessed to be living in The County.

    >>>>Did you know that if too many tourists flush village toilets on a summer’s day there can be a genuine county experience that visitors are guaranteed not to enjoy?

    For sure there are some ‘old’ septic systems in Bloomfield. When we purchased our house in 1972 in Bloomfield the first thing we had to do was install a new septic system… only because when I cut the grass for the first time my foot went through an old oil drum that substituted for a septic tank. I suspect there are still some old oil tanks in The County. When things like that become a health hazard you upgrade. I’m sure even UEL folk understand that.

    >>>>It saddens me to think that your rest is disturbed by those annoying county farmers who are working through the night.

    You have this habit Marnie of making more out of people’s statements to suit you. I never said that ‘I’ was annoyed by my neighbours working through the night. Those are your words, not mine. I admire anyone who works hard making a living. Even now we live across the road from a working farm. When I see my neighbour out cutting hay at 10pm, I fix a cup of coffee and a slice of pie and walk across the street and offer him a break. I know the noise is temporary and understand why it’s there. I’m not complaining. Nor do I complain about other noises… they’re just part of making a living for their families.

    >>>>Who do they think they are? Not quite the same thing as a party barn next door.

    It is the same… it’s people making a living and employing people so that their employees can stay in the County.

    >>>>Farmers do this only for a short period of time in the harvest season. They do it to feed us and I doubt that they find it much fun to work all night. If it keeps you awake perhaps you could find a wedding reception at a party barn somewhere.Just pretend that you’re a friend of the bride’s family and keep repeating “lovely wedding”.

    Just like farmers working nights a short period of time, weddings also do not happen (in barns or elsewhere) 365 days of the year. When a wedding takes place, the barn owner earns a living, the local florist earns a living, the local caterer earns a living, the local musicians earn a living. servers earn a living as well as other service people who ensure successful weddings. Do you even have an appreciation for all of these professional people who help make weddings happen?

    >>>Why do people move from cities to the country for the county experience only to yelp when they actual come face to face with it? Did no one tell you that there are farmers in rural Prince Edward Wolf?

    Now you’re just being silly Marnie. No so long ago this County had more than 2 cheese factories. Not so long ago this County had enough canaries that supplied 60% of all canned vegetables to all of Canada. When people’s tastes shifted from canned veg to frozen and when large factory farms opened in s.w. Ontario that business was lost here. Why? Not keeping pace with change. Every business is faced with competing. If you want a big factory to locate here, we’d better be ready to compete. Not going to happen if we don’t work hard and smart.

    >>>>The next time the loos back up in Bloomfield because all of the passengers on the tour bus used the facilities you may begin to understand that small rural villages cannot cope with a large influx of people.

    I suggest that you might be exaggerating a bit when you say “all of the passengers”. 🙂 How many times has that happened in Bloomfield Marnie? If it’s happened once, then it’s time for Mr. Turpin to get after the works people to remedy the situation. Most coach buses have indoor plumbing.

    >>>Small towns have problems with it as well. Just a word of advice – if any of your farmer neighbours read this thread beware of flying objects that look a lot like over-ripe tomatoes.

    LOL… both my wife and I think that “over-ripe tomatoes” is “country perfume”… doesn’t both us in the least. It just reminds us that we are fortunate to live here. It takes time for city folks to like the perfume. And if they never get it, the probability is high that they will return to the city and enjoy their exhaust fumes more. It doesn’t work for everybody. But those who love it here also add value to the community… my wife and I like to believe that we do.

  25. Marnie says:

    Wolf – If you can remember traffic being backed up almost to what is now the Rosemary Lane development in the 1960’s you were not in Picton. You must have circumnavigated all the way to Toronto in your efforts to avoid Main Street. Main Street was often busy but not to that degree. Unlike you I was not here “off and on”. I lived here full-time and I recall it clearly. We never had to wait through two or more light changes at the liquor store intersection. We did not even have lights there then.

    The county experience should be as John walker has just suggested – something that works for everyone. It has to be enjoyable for local residents and visitors alike. Fine to say that those of us who want to run errands in Picton should be happy to park in some out of the way spot then trot back to Main Street. That works really well for a lot of seniors who are not as spry as they once were or for young mothers with small children in tow or shoppers with packages to carry. And before you ask – I am fully mobile.

    The Bloomfield merchants do not have many options when it comes to the creation of additional parking. It’s a small village with limited facilities. Did you know that if too many tourists flush village toilets on a summer’s day there can be a genuine county experience that visitors are guaranteed not to enjoy?

    It saddens me to think that your rest is disturbed by those annoying county farmers who are working through the night. Who do they think they are? Not quite the same thing as a party barn next door. Farmers do this only for a short period of time in the harvest season. They do it to feed us and I doubt that they find it much fun to work all night. If it keeps you awake perhaps you could find a wedding reception at a party barn somewhere.Just pretend that you’re a friend of the bride’s family and keep repeating “lovely wedding”. Why do people move from cities to the country for the county experience only to yelp when they actual come face to face with it? Did no one tell you that there are farmers in rural Prince Edward Wolf?

    Tourism is a good thing but there is also too much of a good thing and that’s what we have today. The next time the loos back up in Bloomfield because all of the passengers on the tour bus used the facilities you may begin to understand that small rural villages cannot cope with a large influx of people. Small towns have problems with it as well. Just a word of advice – if any of your farmer neighbours read this thread beware of flying objects that look a lot like over-ripe tomatoes.

  26. Wolf Braun says:

    >>>How do we know that everyone in the county wants to see it turned into a big playground?

    Isn’t that part of the municipal election process and economic development Marnie?

    >>>The so-called “county experience” is a lot more than a jug of wine a chunk of cheese and a “thou” in a farm barn turned turned party centre.

    What is the real ‘county experience’ in your opinion? What are the other aspects of county life you refer to?

    >>>Check out Bloomfield these days – often no parking spaces for local residents wanting to use the bank, post office or library.

    I’m sure the merchants and restaurants in Bloomfield would like nothing better than more parking spaces to accommodate more business. What’s the solution?

    >>>>For the people who actually live here traffic on Picton’s Main Street is a nightmare in tourist season. We are not equipped to handle it and it’s getting worse.

    It’s been like that in July-August since the ’60’s. Those are the two months when Sandbanks Park brings in some 350,000 campers. As someone who has been here on and off since that time, I’ve figured out (along with others) how to circumnavigate main street. It’s 2 of 12 months of the year. And those 2 months are important to the merchants in Picton. Again, what would you suggest be done?

    >>>Slowly more and more of the county’s natural beauty spots are being commercially developed to cater to the tourists. It’s harder and harder to find tranquil rural settings. Before long the county experience that once brought summer visitors here is going to lose a lot of its charm. How is it that people who have lived here for 15 minutes always know just what we want and how we should improve the county? It’s great to have them but before they speak for us they might want to consider that we have enjoyed a very different county experience and are not eager to see it lost.

    Which particular spots are you concerned about Marnie? Once again, what is it that you like to have for the County?

  27. Wolf Braun says:

    Art: “I cannot imagine living close to this noise pollution night after night.”

    How would you feel living next door to a farm when the farmer is out plowing, cultivating or cutting hay until 2 in the morning and his equipment is keeping you awake?

  28. John Walker says:

    Totally agree Marnie a solid plan would include all stakeholders and keeping the charm of county would need to be a key driver along with other important aspects of county life
    its all about balance and being sensitive to key stakeholder needs and an economic development plan that supports local growth , local employment and is inclusive

    May be a good start would be to revisit and define the County Experince so that a plan can be aligned around it

  29. Lori Cairns says:

    Standing ovation for Marnie!!!!!!

  30. Marnie says:

    How do we know that everyone in the county wants to see it turned into a big playground? The so-called “county experience” is a lot more than a jug of wine a chunk of cheese and a “thou” in a farm barn turned turned party centre. Tourism is dandy but not when it begins to crowd out other aspects of county life. Right now we are rather like the folks who own a beach house and find themselves with a houseful of company every weekend like it or not. Peace and quiet is no longer possible. Check out Bloomfield these days – often no parking spaces for local residents wanting to use the bank, post office or library.

    For the people who actually live here traffic on Picton’s Main Street is a nightmare in tourist season. We are not equipped to handle it and it’s getting worse.

    Slowly more and more of the county’s natural beauty spots are being commercially developed to cater to the tourists. It’s harder and harder to find tranquil rural settings. Before long the county experience that once brought summer visitors here is going to lose a lot of its charm. How is it that people who have lived here for 15 minutes always know just what we want and how we should improve the county? It’s great to have them but before they speak for us they might want to consider that we have enjoyed a very different county experience and are not eager to see it lost.

  31. John Walker says:

    Steve I agree on many fronts about the lack of leadership on ecomic development especially in the support of tourism growth Having been the Dean of Hospitalty and Culinary Arts at George Brown College Toronto for over a decade( with lots of experience in the tourism sector and have just moved down here from Toronto because my partner and I love the county experience,) I am shocked at the disconnect going on in regards to tourism opportunities and the narrow vision of our local councellors – and the divisiveness that seems to be surfacing between some farmers and wineries In reference to Taste of the County …. It has crested , and its time to rethink the whole culinary tourism vision / strategy for PEC and give it a much bigger leap that would tell a bigger story to include all of the experiences and bring everyone together with innovation being a key driver

    Dan Taylor was a big loss to the county and things have drifted …

    I would love to chat with you more… Or with anyone else who has a passion for tourism/ economic development and getting it back on the radar screen in this wonderfull part of Ontario

    Regards

    John Walker

    innovatealot@yahoo.ca

  32. Snowman says:

    Gee Steve Campbell, gotta say this is a pretty lame attempt. First, you try to convince us that Tim Hudak
    is really a nice guy and not Mike Harris redux. Looks like, at this point that Ontario voters aren’t buying it.

    Then, you pull a letter out of The Welly Times, written by a guy that you “tend to disagree on… everything” with and proceed to tell us he’s wrong. What a surprise!
    Next, you state that “low paid part time jobs are virtually the only thing The County has to offer right now.”
    Please tell me you don’t believe that, that you won’t settle for low pay/part time. Is that what Dan Taylor would accept?

  33. Art says:

    Steve
    Guess the neighbouring property owners who live near Fields of West Lake and Hillier Creek Estates are suppose to sleep with ear plugs in?
    I think that you are barking up the wrong tree Steve. I would be doing the same thing as those property owners.
    I have attended several functions at Fields at West Lake. It was very loud, and functions went very late. The toilets backed up and everyone moved outside as it just got far too smelly.
    I cannot imagine living close to this noise pollution night after night.
    Nice spot just wrong location Steve.
    “neighbours, who put their interests ahead of economic growth”

    Yes that is true….what would you do if you lived next door?

    What exactly do you think Fields of West Lake and Hillier Creek Estates are doing? Hmmm putting their interests first.

  34. Wolf Braun says:

    ‘guys’…. is that really what a well-trained server asks?

  35. Marnie says:

    Maybe if more of them stopped asking “do youse guys want more coffee?” it would be easier to grasp the professionalism.

  36. Wolf Braun says:

    Some attitudes about ‘server jobs’ come from not recognizing them as “professionals”! That’s not the case in most of Europe.

    If you want to work in the hospitality industry in Europe and Scandinavia you first have to have training. In many cases, training consists of an apprenticeship. Upon completion of the apprentice period (which can be as long as 2 years), you are considered a ‘professional’. And you are paid as a professional.

    In N. America we consider working in the hospitality industry as entry level jobs paying minimum wages. I doubt if any restaurant patrons views their host/waiter/waitress as a professional.

    This attitude about separating jobs into ‘professional’ and ‘not professional’ is archaic. It needs to change. Along with certain other attitudes. Only when you think that way of all professions will you see real change. Along with better wages.

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